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World News Forum Ex-leader: rebel Kurds have left Iraq at News Forum - AP - Kurdish separatists who have found haven in northern Iraq in their fight for autonomy from Turkey have returned ...

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Old 11-30-2007, 10:07 AM   #1
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Default Ex-leader: rebel Kurds have left Iraq

AP - Kurdish separatists who have found haven in northern Iraq in their fight for autonomy from Turkey have returned to their homeland in the past two weeks and Iran-based rebels have taken their place, the rebel leader's brother said.



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Old 07-22-2009, 11:35 PM   #2
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Civil War in Iraq?...

Why Kurds vs. Arabs Could Be Iraq's Next Civil War
Wed Jul 22,`09 - With a projected capacity of about 40,000 bbl. a day, the new oil refinery inaugurated on July 18 by the Kurdish regional government of northern Iraq is modest even by the standards of Iraq's dilapidated oil industry. But its significance shouldn't be underestimated: in Kurdish minds, the region's ability to refine the oil it pumps is a vital step toward deepening its autonomy from the Arab-majority remainder of Iraq.
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Until recently, Iraqi Kurdistan had no refineries of its own, and though the area is sitting on a huge pool of oil, it had to rely on gasoline supplies from elsewhere in Iraq, Turkey or Iran. Fearful of giving Iraq's ethnic Kurdish minority any control over the country's most precious resource, Saddam Hussein had not only declined to build refineries in the region; he made sure Iraq's oil pipelines bypassed Kurdish areas, and his army forcibly removed much of the Kurdish population from Kirkuk - the most important oil-producing area in the north - and repopulated the city with Arabs from the south.

Since Saddam's demise, however, the autonomous Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) is steadily developing an independent oil industry in northern Iraq. It has discovered and begun to develop new oil fields inside its boundaries, and has entered production-sharing deals with foreign oil companies that were made without the consent of the federal government in Baghdad. Those deals have raised suspicions among Iraq's Arab-dominated government that KRG is not simply taking on more of the prerogatives of sovereign statehood but is actually laying the economic infrastructure for independence.

For their part, Kurdish officials suspect that Baghdad's failure to pass a national oil law (which would give Iraq's provincial governments greater control over the industry in their territory) and its failure to press ahead with a referendum to settle Kurdish claims to Kirkuk and other disputed areas are signs that the Arab majority plans to settle matters in its favor. Such is the enmity, in fact, that KRG's president, Massoud Barzani, and Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki haven't spoken in over a year. Recently, KRG Prime Minister Nechirwan Barzani said that Arab-Kurdish relations in Iraq are at their lowest point since Saddam was in power. With Iraq's Sunni-Shi'ite sectarian violence largely in check, the Kurdish-Arab dispute has become the most worrisome fault line in Iraq.

Ever since the U.S. invasion, the Kurds of northern Iraq have enjoyed many of the trappings of sovereignty. Kurds have their own parliament and executive government, plus an 80,000-strong army (the Pesh Merga militia) and control over their borders, which Baghdad-controlled security forces are not allowed to enter. Despite the fact that the vast majority of Kurds want independence from Iraq, their leaders have proceeded with caution, mindful of the risks. Their small, landlocked region is surrounded by neighbors - Turkey, Syria, Iran - whose own restive Kurdish minorities make them hostile to the prospect of an independent Kurdish state emerging in Iraq.

More Why Kurds vs. Arabs Could Be Iraq's Next Civil War - Yahoo! News
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Old 07-25-2009, 03:45 PM   #3
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Rebel Kurds?


U.S. President George W. Bush (R) shakes hands with Kurdish President Massoud Barzani after a meeting in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington on October 29, 2008. (UPI Photo/Matthew Cavanaugh/POOL)

Massoud Barzani - News, Photos, Quotes, Biography - UPI.com

ahh.. the kiss of judas!

poems..

Kurdish Poetry Links
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Old 07-11-2011, 09:55 PM   #4
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Iranian incursion into Iraq to get at the Kurds...

Iranian forces cross Iraqi border
July 11, 2011 -- Iranian forces are stationed about a 1 1/2 miles inside the Iraq border as part of an operation targeting Kurdish militants, a border official said.
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A source inside the border patrol in the northern Kurdish provinces of Iraq said Iranian forces crossed the border during the weekend in pursuit of members of the Party for Free Life in Kurdistan, or PJAK. "The Iranian force is still stationed at the same positions it penetrated into on Sunday, following clashes between both sides," the source told the Voices of Iraqi news agency.

Turkey has been locked in battle with militants from the separatist Kurdistan Workers' Party, or PKK, since 1984. Iran has fought PKK counterparts with PJAK along its border with Turkey and Iraq. The border skirmish comes as U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta told reporters that the remaining U.S. forces in Iraq would confront Iran in its alleged support of Shiite militias operating southern Iraq.

"I think the key right now is to go after them in Iraq and do what we can to prevent those weapons coming into Iraq and go after those groups that would make use of those weapons," he said. "That's what the principal focus has to be on."

Read more: Iranian forces cross Iraqi border - UPI.com
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Old 09-21-2017, 12:52 AM   #5
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Iraq tryin' to block Kurdish state...

Iraqi Supreme Court Suspends Kurdish Referendum
Monday 18th September, 2017 - Iraq's supreme court has approved a request by Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi to suspend an independence referendum that the country's Kurdistan region planned to hold later this month.
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The court said Monday the vote will be on hold until it reviews cases regarding the constitutionality of the vote. Abadi has repeatedly spoken out against the referendum, including in an interview with the Associated Press on Saturday in which he called the independence vote a 'dangerous escalation' that would invite violations of Iraqi sovereignty.

Abadi also told an Iraqi news agency that the Kurds would be 'playing with fire' by continuing with plans for the referendum in the three governorates that make up the Kurdish autonomous region. The Kurdish region has repeatedly ignored calls to cancel the referendum, and the supreme court has little power to implement its order.

Turkish opposition

On Friday, Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim warned that the Iraqi Kurdish plan to hold an independence referendum was a 'grave mistake.'


FILE - Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim speaks during a meeting with representatives of German companies, in Ankara, Turkey, July 27, 2017.

Iraqi Kurdistan regional President Masoud Barzani is backing the referendum. Turkey, which borders the Iraqi Kurdish region, has strong ties with Barzani, but Ankara has been stepping up its pressure to call off the vote. 'We don't want to impose sanctions, but, if we arrive at that point, there are steps that have been already planned that Turkey can take,' Yildirim said.

Ankara, with its own restive Kurdish minority, that mainly borders Iraqi Kurdistan, fears an independent Kurdish state could fuel similar secessionist demands. Those fears are heightened by the suspicion that Syrian Kurds on the Turkish border harbor the same independence ambitions.

US against plan

The United States has voiced strong opposition to the independence vote. On Friday the White House released a statement saying the United States 'does not support' the Kurdish plan to hold a referendum, saying the plan 'is distracting from efforts to defeat ISIS and stabilize the liberated areas.' Further, it says, 'Holding the referendum in disputed areas is particularly provocative and destabilizing.'

The Trump administration is calling on the Kurds to cancel the referendum and instead engage in 'serious and sustained dialogue with Baghdad,' which the U.S. has offered to facilitate. Iran has also registered its opposition to the referendum, but Turkey arguably has the most leverage on the Iraqi Kurds. The Habur border gate on Turkey's frontier with Iraq is the main trade route to the outside world for Iraqi Kurdistan, while an oil pipeline to the Turkish Mediterranean port of Ceyhan provides a financial lifeline.

Iraqi Supreme Court Suspends Kurdish Referendum
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Old 10-27-2017, 03:15 AM   #6
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Kurdish compromise for peace and autonomy...

In Major Reversal, Iraqi Kurds Offer To Freeze Their Independence Bid
October 25, 2017 Iraqi military forces have recently retaken control of areas held by Kurdish forces, such as the city of Kirkuk. Today's offer from the Kurdish government is not likely to defuse the crisis.
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In a major turnaround, the Kurdish regional government in Iraq is offering to freeze the results of last month's controversial independence referendum. The Iraqi government and other regional and international powers opposed the nonbinding vote, which was approved by a wide margin but did not take place under the supervision of international election monitors. Iraqi military forces have recently retaken control of areas held by Kurdish forces, such as the city of Kirkuk.

And today's offer from the Kurdish government is not likely to defuse the crisis, NPR's Jane Arraf reports: "The Iraqi government has made clear that it will keep pushing to retake border posts and other areas previously under Kurdish control." The statement from the Kurdish regional government, published by the Kurdish news site Rudaw, essentially offers to stop pursuing independence for now. "It is a fact that a war between the two sides will not have a winner. It will instead lead both sides to great damages in all aspects of life," the statement reads.


Photos of Kurdish president Masoud Barzani hang Wednesday on the walls of the central bazaar in Irbil, Iraq.

It proposes the following:

* "The immediate cessation of fighting and every kind of military operations in the Kurdistan Region.
* "Freezing the outcome of the referendum that was held in the Iraqi Kurdistan.
* "Beginning an open dialogue between the Kurdistan Regional Government and the federal government on the basis of the Iraqi constitution."

As Jane reports, "It's a dramatic turnaround for Kurdish president Massoud Barzani who had promised to set Kurds on the path to independence. Iraq, the United States and all of the Kurdish regions neighbors had opposed holding the vote. Kurdish parties themselves were divided on the timing of the referendum."

The government of Iraq has not formally responded. A member of parliament close to Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi told the BBC that he wanted to see the Kurds annul the poll result, rather than freeze it. A freeze, he said, would constitute a "time bomb" that the region "could throw at the central government whenever it wishes." Iraq's Kurdish authorities operate autonomously. They have their own security forces, the Peshmerga, that has played a significant role in the fight against ISIS. The U.S. opposed the vote over fears that it could destabilize the region and affect the fight against ISIS militants.

In Major Reversal, Iraqi Kurds Offer To Freeze Their Independence Bid : The Two-Way : NPR
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