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Old 04-02-2013, 12:45 AM   #21
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Around here the cops are afraid of `em `cause they got automatic weapons...

Cartels dispatch agents deep inside US
April 1, 2013 — Mexican drug cartels whose operatives once rarely ventured beyond the U.S. border are dispatching some of their most trusted agents to live and work deep inside the United States — an emboldened presence that experts believe is meant to tighten their grip on the world's most lucrative narcotics market and maximize profits.
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If left unchecked, authorities say, the cartels' move into the American interior could render the syndicates harder than ever to dislodge and pave the way for them to expand into other criminal enterprises such as prostitution, kidnapping-and-extortion rackets and money laundering. Cartel activity in the U.S. is certainly not new. Starting in the 1990s, the ruthless syndicates became the nation's No. 1 supplier of illegal drugs, using unaffiliated middlemen to smuggle cocaine, marijuana and heroin beyond the border or even to grow pot here.

But a wide-ranging Associated Press review of federal court cases and government drug-enforcement data, plus interviews with many top law enforcement officials, indicate the groups have begun deploying agents from their inner circles to the U.S. Cartel operatives are suspected of running drug-distribution networks in at least nine non-border states, often in middle-class suburbs in the Midwest, South and Northeast. "It's probably the most serious threat the United States has faced from organized crime," said Jack Riley, head of the Drug Enforcement Administration's Chicago office.

The cartel threat looms so large that one of Mexico's most notorious drug kingpins — a man who has never set foot in Chicago — was recently named the city's Public Enemy No. 1, the same notorious label once assigned to Al Capone. The Chicago Crime Commission, a non-government agency that tracks crime trends in the region, said it considers Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman even more menacing than Capone because Guzman leads the deadly Sinaloa cartel, which supplies most of the narcotics sold in Chicago and in many cities across the U.S.

Years ago, Mexico faced the same problem — of then-nascent cartels expanding their power — "and didn't nip the problem in the bud," said Jack Killorin, head of an anti-trafficking program in Atlanta for the Office of National Drug Control Policy. "And see where they are now." Riley sounds a similar alarm: "People think, 'The border's 1,700 miles away. This isn't our problem.' Well, it is. These days, we operate as if Chicago is on the border." Border states from Texas to California have long grappled with a cartel presence. But cases involving cartel members have now emerged in the suburbs of Chicago and Atlanta, as well as Columbus, Ohio, Louisville, Ky., and rural North Carolina. Suspects have also surfaced in Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota and Pennsylvania.

More AP IMPACT: Cartels dispatch agents deep inside US | CNS News
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Old 08-01-2013, 06:20 PM   #22
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Drug Cartels Have 'Representatives' in 2,000 U.S. Cities...

Border Patrol Union: Drug Cartels Have 'Representatives' in 2,000 U.S. Cities
August 1, 2013 – In a July 28 letter addressed to “fellow Americans,” the union of former Border Patrol agents called for Congress to deny amnesty to illegal aliens and cited “transnational criminal businesses” that have “representatives” in 2,000 American cities.
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“Transnational criminal enterprises have annually invested millions of dollars to create and staff international drug and human smuggling networks inside the United States; thus it is no surprise that they continue to accelerate their efforts to get trusted representatives in place as a means to guarantee continued success,” the letter, distributed via email by Zach Taylor, chairman of National Association of Former Border Patrol Officers, Inc., stated.

“We must never lose sight of the fact that the United States is the market place for the bulk of transnational criminal businesses engaged in human trafficking and the smuggling, distribution and sale of illegal drugs,” the letter, signed by former agents for the U.S., Canada, Southwest and U.S./Mexico border chapters, stated. “Organized crime on this scale we are speaking about cannot exist without political protection. “Most heroin, cocaine, meth, and marijuana marketed in the United States is produced outside of our country, and then smuggled into the United States,” the letter stated. “The placement of trusted foreign employees inside the United States is imperative to insure success in continuing to supply the demand, and returning the profits to the foreign organization.

“Members of these vicious transnational crime syndicates are already well established in more than 2,000 American cities and their numbers are increasing as networks expand and demands accelerate,” the letter stated. “These transnational criminals present a real and present danger to all Americans, and they live among us.” The organization stated in the letter that “sanctuary cities” that allow criminal illegal aliens to live and work with impunity are partly to blame for the U.S. criminal network and urged Congress not to grant amnesty to the estimated 11 million people who are in the country illegally. “Sanctuary cities established throughout the United States discourage even the most basic law enforcement initiatives within their boundaries against these predatory criminals,” the letter stated. “Encouraged by Congress and a disinterested mainstream news media, these havens deny the American public their constitutional right to national security and public safety while providing relative safety for dangerous foreign criminals.

“Congress must abandon their focus on rewarding illegal behavior for millions of persons by the grant of amnesty in favor of protecting American citizens who suffer daily at the hands of these seasoned criminals,” the letter stated. “To do otherwise makes a mockery of our laws, and encourages countless millions more from around the globe to do the same. “Transnational organized crime nationwide has flourished under these conditions,” the letter concluded.

- See more at: Border Patrol Union: Drug Cartels Have 'Representatives' in 2,000 U.S. Cities | CNS News
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Wildlife Biologists: Illegal Pot Farms Wreaking Havoc on Endangered Species
July 31, 2013 -- Illegal marijuana cultivation on public and tribal land has been identified as the culprit in the deaths of at-risk wildlife and environmental degradation throughout California, Oregon and Washington, according to researchers who have been investigating and documenting hundreds of marijuana “grow sites” since 2005.
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The project, a collaboration between wildlife biologists at the University of California - Davis, the U.S. Forest Service, the Hoopa Valley Tribe, and other organizations, began with an examination into the causes of mortality in threatened fisher populations. Researcher Mourad Gabriel documented “multiple contamination sites from marijuana cultivation, specifically the mass abuse of anticoagulant rodenticide as well as other toxicants at these sites.” “It’s a novel threat,” Gabriel, president and co-founder of Integral Ecology Research Center and a researcher at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, told CNSNews.com, adding that “there’s a lack of data” regarding the environmental impact of illegal pot farms.

Gabriel hopes that his team’s research will garner greater awareness among the public and policymakers “on the misconceptions that marijuana cultivation has little to no environmental impact . . . We’re seeing a strong negative effect of marijuana cultivation on our public and tribal lands.” California’s biodiversity makes it home to a wide variety of endangered and threatened species, including salmon, spotted owls, great gray owls, and Sierra-Nevada red foxes. Much of Gabriel’s work is focused on the fisher, an animal in the weasel family that is a candidate for listing under the Endangered Species Act. “All of these species inhabit either previously or potentially occupied marijuana cultivation sites,” Gabriel pointed out, and “are either potentially at risk or currently at risk” due to contact with the rodenticide used to protect marijuana plants.

Earlier this year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service awarded a $200,000 grant to the Hoopa Valley Tribe in northwestern California to research activities affecting tribal lands, which are “inundated with trespass grows” by drug trafficking groups “that are coming in [and] clearing their land to grow and cultivate marijuana,” according to Gabriel. “This is a vested interest of theirs, to protect their sovereign land.” Teams of volunteer have cleaned up and reclaimed 637 cultivation sites on public lands so far, according to Gabriel. These sites, found in only two out of 17 national forests in California, are “just a fraction of the grow sites that are currently present.”

The Humboldt County Sherriff’s Office used Google Earth technology to document 4,100 greenhouses that were cultivating marijuana plants on private land in the county in 2012, but only had sufficient resources to eradicate less than 2 percent of the grow sites due to limited funding. “If we were to have our drug task force go ahead and investigate two to three sites every day, it would take them multiple years just to hit every one of those 4,100 grow sites,” Gabriel explained. According to a 2010 report, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime estimated that “law enforcement around the world only seizes 10-20 percent of the drugs produced.” Mark Higley, wildlife biologist for the Hoopa Valley Tribe, noted an additional 215 grow sites that are “quasi-legal” because they are “growing openly with medical marijuana recommendations.” “It often feels like we are running around like Chicken Little saying, ‘The sky is falling,’” Higley said. However, “it is clear that the problem is real, widespread and possibly getting worse.”

- See more at: http://cnsnews.com/news/article/wild....ETvxGgL3.dpuf

Last edited by waltky; 08-01-2013 at 06:30 PM.
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Old 08-09-2013, 01:58 AM   #23
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U.S. Pot Growers Competing with Mexican Drug Cartels...

U.S. Pot Growers Competing with Mexican Drug Cartels, Drug Enforcement Official Says
August 8, 2013 – A Houston television station reported in May that the legalization of marijuana in some states has created more pot growers in the U.S. – and new competition for Mexican drug cartels.
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“Mexican drug cartels fighting each other for smuggling routes face increasing competition in the U.S., where legalization in some states has increased the amount of marijuana available,” the May 15 report by KHOU stated. “The drug war in Mexico may have helped U.S. growers gain a foothold in some regions,” the report stated.

Reporter Angela Kocherga interviewed an undercover narcotics officer with the El Paso Police Department. “The majority of this weed is coming from California. A little bit of it is coming from Colorado,” the unnamed officer said. The report said two people were arrested recently in an El Paso neighborhood after police found large quantities of “Kush,” a more potent and expensive form of marijuana produced in the United States.

Howard Campbell, a professor at the University of Texas El Paso and author of “Drug War Zone,” told the television station that Mexican drug cartels will find an “economic” way to compete with U.S. pot producers by producing more of the drug and selling it for less. In October 2012, the Mexican Competitiveness Institute issued a report “If Our Neighbors Legalize,” which was reported on by Fox News and other media outlets. The report said legalization of pot in U.S. states could “cut Mexican drug cartel earnings from traffic to the U.S. by as much as 30%.”

- See more at: U.S. Pot Growers Competing with Mexican Drug Cartels, Drug Enforcement Official Says | CNS News
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Old 11-18-2017, 10:40 AM   #24
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Mexican drug cartels are infiltrating Texas...

New report shows how Mexican cartels are infiltrating Texas
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 - Mexican cartels smuggle more drugs into the U.S. than any other criminal group, the federal Drug Enforcement Administration said in a new report.
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The 2017 National Drug Threat Assessment released in October lists six cartels as having major influences across the country and Texas. Cartels' influence in Texas is far-reaching, affecting cities hundreds of miles from the state's border with Mexico. San Antonio is the only city in the state with a drug trade controlled by the Cartel Jalisco Nueva Generacion, which deals mostly with methamphetamine, cocaine, heroin and marijuana, according to the DEA,


Members of the Juarez Cartel, Sinaloa Cartel and Cartel Jalisco Nueva Generacion can all be found in this West Texas city, according to the DEA. The Juarez Cartel has the most influence.

The Gulf Cartel has a hold on cities in Texas' tip and coastal bend. McAllen, Brownsville, Corpus Christi, Galveston, Houston and Beaumont are impacted most by the Gulf Cartel which mostly brings marijuana and cocaine into the area, according to the DEA. Drugs smuggled through the Gulf Cartel are mostly brought in through the area between the Rio Grande Valley and South Padre Island. Every week in Houston, a relative of a Gulf Cartel leader receives 100 kilograms of cocaine, according to the DEA.

Moving West, Los Zetas control two cities and the Juarez Cartel has a hold on Alpine, Midland, El Paso and Lubbock. While the arrests of two Los Zetas leaders has weakened the cartel's influence on Eagle Pass and Laredo, its presence is still felt because of members who have assumed control, bringing cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine and marijuana into Texas. The Sinaloa Cartel, formerly run by prison escape artist Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman," is most found in Dallas, Lubbock and Fort Worth, according to the DEA.

New report shows how Mexican cartels are infiltrating Texas - San Antonio Express-News
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