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Old 12-24-2008, 10:39 AM   #1
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Default Police arrest Mexican beauty queen

CNN - Found 1 hour ago
A 23-year-old beauty queen and seven men arrested in vehicles loaded with weapons and cash near the central Mexico city of Guadalajara have been ...
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Old 01-24-2009, 04:59 PM   #2
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Buncha animals down there...

Mexico: Man admits dissolving 300 bodies
Sat., Jan. 24, 2009 - Authorities arrest suspect accused of helping drug lord dispose of victims
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A man accused of helping a Mexican drug kingpin dispose of hundreds of victims by dissolving their bodies in acid was arrested in the border city of Tijuana, authorities said Friday. A Mexican military statement said Santiago Meza Lopez confessed to disposing of at least 300 bodies over a decade, but authorities provided no further evidence to back the claim. Officials contend he dumped the bodies in graves, poured acid on them and let them dissolve underground.

The victims are believed to be rivals of Teodoro Garcia Simental, an alleged former lieutenant of the Tijuana-based Arellano Felix drug cartel, authorities said. Soldiers and police paraded Meza, 45, before reporters at a cement-block shack on the outskirts of Tijuana where he allegedly disposed of the bodies. Two grave-sized holes had been dug near the walls.

The security officers had Meza tell reporters how he allegedly got rid of the bodies, prodding him to speak up whenever he mumbled. Meza, who has not yet been charged, was arrested along with three other people Thursday at a Tijuana hotel. He told reporters Friday that he got paid $600 a week for his work and repeated his claim that he had disposed of 300 bodies.

Earlier this month, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration identified Garcia as one of 10 men it believes are battling for drug trafficking routes through Tijuana. The DEA said Garcia is the chief rival of alleged Arellano Felix cartel leader Fernando Sanchez Arrellano. Mexican officials have blamed the power struggle for a surge in violence in Tijuana, the birthplace of the Arellano Felix cartel. The two men split in April after a shootout between their followers in Tijuana left at least 14 people dead, Mexican and U.S. officials say.
More Mexico: Man admits dissolving 300 bodies - Americas- msnbc.com

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Top Mexico Cops Charged With Favoring Drug Cartel
Jan. 24, 2009 - Arrests Indicate Mexico's Top Police May Have Favored Powerful Drug Cartel
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President Felipe Calderon's war on drug trafficking has led to his own doorstep, with the arrest of a dozen high-ranking officials with alleged ties to Mexico's most powerful drug gang, the Sinaloa Cartel. The U.S. praises Calderon for rooting out corruption at the top. But critics say the arrests reveal nothing more than a timeworn government tactic of protecting one cartel and cracking down on others. Operation Clean House comes just as the U.S. is giving Mexico its first installment of $400 million in equipment and technology to fight drugs. Most will go to a beefed-up federal police agency run by the same people whose top aides have been arrested as alleged Sinaloa spies.

"If there is anything worse than a corrupt and ill-equipped cop, it is a corrupt and well-equipped cop," said criminal justice expert Jorge Chabat, who studies the drug trade. U.S. drug enforcement agents say they have no qualms about sending support to Mexico. "We've been working with the Mexican government for decades at the DEA," said Garrison Courtney, spokesman for the Drug Enforcement Administration. "Obviously, we ensure that the individuals we work with are vetted."

Agents who conduct raids have long suspected Mexican government ties to Sinaloa, and rival drug gangs have advertised the alleged connection in banners hung from freeways. While raids against the rival Gulf cartel have netted suspects, those against Sinaloa almost always came up empty _ or worse, said Agent Oscar Granados Salero of the Federal Investigative Agency, Mexico's equivalent of the FBI. "Whenever we were trying to serve arrest warrants, they were already waiting for us, and a lot of colleagues lost their lives that way," Salero said. The U.S. government estimates that the cartels smuggle $15 billion to $20 billion in drug money across the border each year.
More http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2009/...n4751068.shtml

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Old 06-02-2009, 10:47 PM   #3
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Gettin' to the root of the corruption...

Mexico detains 29 officers for ‘drug ties’
Wednesday, Jun 03, 2009, Soldiers and federal agents detained 29 police officers in northern Mexico on Monday for alleged ties to drug traffickers.
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It was Mexico’s latest sweep to root out corruption among police and government officials, which has been a major impediment to Mexican President Felipe Calderon’s battle against drug cartels. Last week, federal officials arrested 10 mayors and 20 other officials in the western state of Michoacan on suspicion of protecting La Familia cartel.

Soldiers and state and federal agents detained the 29 officers at police headquarters in the cities of Monterrey, San Nicolas de los Garza, Apodaca and the state public security offices, Nuevo Leon state district attorney Luis Carlos Trevino. The officers were detained after soldiers found evidence linking them to drug dealers who were arrested last month, the state government said in a statement. It did not give details on the evidence.

“We are working on cleaning up forces and this is one step of many that have to be taken to achieve that,” Trevino said. Trevino said none of the 29 had been charged. Outside of the state police headquarters, about 60 people who said they were relatives of the detained officers protested against military intrusion in police activities. Calderon has sent more than 40,000 soldiers to battle drug trafficking across the country and acknowledged that corruption is pervasive among Mexican police at all levels.

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Old 09-04-2010, 04:08 PM   #4
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Women involved in Mexican drug cartels...

Mexican women work, die in gangs
Sunday, Sep 05, 2010, More women are working and dying for powerful drug cartels in Mexico’s most violent city as high unemployment along the US border sucks desperate families into the lethal trade.
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Once almost unheard of in the macho world of drug trafficking, a record 179 women have been killed by rival hitmen so far this year in Ciudad Juarez, the notorious city across from El Paso, Texas, as teenage girls and even mothers with small children sign up with the cartels, authorities say. “They killed them, they killed them!” residents of one poor area of Ciudad Juarez shouted in June after two 15-year-old girls were shot down in a murder police blamed on drug gangs. Last month, three teenage girls were shot dead at a drug-fueled party that neighbors said lasted three days.

The involvement of women in Mexico’s drug underworld underscores the challenges facing Mexican President Felipe Calderon as he struggles to reverse escalating violence and bolster an economy that cannot provide legal work for the poor. More than 28,000 people have died in drug violence since Calderon launched his campaign against cartels in late 2006 and the bloodshed shows no sign of slowing. In Ciudad Juarez, which became famous in the 1990s for the unsolved murders of hundreds of women, many of them factory workers, 6,400 people have died in the last two-and-a-half years.

Calderon faces a formidable task in turning around the border city, the home to factories producing goods exported to US consumers. It was once a party town for US tourists, but has become an eerie no-man’s land gripped by gruesome attacks. Violence is taking on a different tone there as women suspected of working for drug gangs are shot by rivals on busy streets, often in front of their children, a deviation from cartels’ traditional honor codes barring attacks on women. “Ninety percent of female homicides in Ciudad Juarez are linked to organized crime,” said Patricia Gonzalez, attorney general for Chihuahua state, which includes the border city. “The women are probably involved.”

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Old 11-10-2010, 06:39 PM   #5
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Obama got `em onna run...

Letter: Mexican cartel offers to dissolve itself
10 Nov.`10 - A letter allegedly signed by a major Mexican drug cartel offers to dissolve the gang if the government promises to protect citizens in the western state where it is based, authorities said Wednesday.
Quote:
Prosecutors said they couldn't immediately verify the letter's authenticity — or the offer's sincerity — but stressed the federal government does not negotiate with drug cartels. The one-page letter allegedly signed by "La Familia Michoacana" drug cartel was dropped in the streets of some mountain towns in the western state of Michoacan on Tuesday, according to the Michoacan bureau of the federal Attorney General's Office. It also showed up as a banner above an overpass and was sent as an e-mail to reporters.

The missive claims La Familia wants to protect Michoacan and its residents and says the group will disband if federal police promise to act honestly and fight to the death to defend the state. "We have decided to retreat and return to our daily productive activities if the federal and local authorities ... promise to take control of the state with force and decision," read the letter, dated November 2010. "If the government accepts this public commitment and lives up to it, La Familia Michoacana will dissolve."

Federal officials, however, say the cartel itself has victimized Michoacan with kidnappings, extortion, hundreds of murders, decapitations and drug trafficking. Last year, they say, the gang unleashed a spasm of violence in which at least 18 police officers were killed. Last week, in response to the arrest of two members, the gang set ablaze trucks to block entries to the state capital and sprayed a shopping mall with automatic-weapons fire, the state attorney general's office said.

The letter allegedly written by La Familia says the gang's decision to possibly dissolve was motivated by alleged abuses against civilians by authorities conducting warrantless searches and arrests to combat the cartel. An employee of the Attorney General's Office in Michoacan said authorities were investigating the letter's origin but could not immediately confirm its authenticity. The employee spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to be quoted by name.

If the letter is to be believed, experts say the cartel could be willing to close up shop because it has simply run its course. Gary Hale, who retired this year as an intelligence officer in the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and founded the Grupo Savant consulting firm, said they could be trying to find a way out so they could make money by less violent means.

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Old 12-02-2010, 05:40 AM   #6
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Granny been tellin' Uncle Ferd to stayaway from dem Hispexican womens...

Female felons swell ranks among Mexican criminals
2 Dec.`10 — Eunice Ramírez, 19, modeled by day, working as a hostess at corporate functions, sporting events and political rallies.
Quote:
On the side, the Ciudad Juárez native allegedly moonlighted in a kidnapping gang, luring unsuspecting men into abductions, until her arrest Oct. 27, according to the Chihuahua state attorney general's office. The model-turned-accused kidnapper is an example of the growing number of women swelling the ranks of criminal groups and participating in illegal activities in Mexico, where a crackdown on drug cartels and organized crime has claimed more than 28,000 lives since December 2006.

Ramírez's arrest highlights a shift in the relationship between women and criminal groups: Women now participate in kidnappings, extortion and even hits. And their roles go beyond simply being mixed up with the wrong crowd — as was alleged to have happened with a raven-haired beauty queen, Laura Zuñiga, who the federal attorney general's office said was arrested in December 2008 with a posse of cartel toughs. (She was released five weeks later.) The National Women's Institute (Inmujeres) reported a 400% increase in the number of women imprisoned for federal crimes — mainly drugs and guns — over the past three years. Inmujeres put the number of women incarcerated for federal crimes at 4,292. The reasons for women meddling in organized crime remain a matter of dispute. Mexico City human rights lawyer Luis Jorge de la Peña estimates at least 40% of the females convicted for drug crimes were coerced by their boyfriends or husbands to either transport contraband between cities or smuggle drugs into prisons.

"Normally, there are cases of women knowing what their husbands have done, but they are convicted as accomplices for not denouncing them," de la Peña said. Some women have ascended to the top echelons of criminal organizations, although such instances are rare. Sandra Ávila Beltrán, known as the "Queen of the Pacific," gained notoriety for her luxurious lifestyle and role as an alleged key go-between for Mexican and Colombian cartels before her 2007 arrest, according to the federal attorney general's office. Colombian model Angie Sanclemente Valencia generated scandalous headlines for her May arrest in Argentina and police allegations that she recruited pretty girls to move drugs northward.

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Old 07-25-2013, 05:04 AM   #7
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Knights Templar cartel stages a coordinated series of ambushes...

MEXICO'S DRUG WAR BOILS OVER AGAIN IN MICHOACAN
Jul 24,`13 -- Mexico's rough western state of Michoacan, producer of avocados and waves of migrants, is proving just as painful a thorn in the side of President Enrique Pena Nieto as it was for his predecessor, Felipe Calderon.
Quote:
Coming off a stunning success with the capture of Zetas cartel leader Miguel Angel Trevino Morales, Pena Nieto almost immediately was plunged back into the bloody reality of Mexico's drug war this week as gunmen believed to be working for the Knights Templar cartel staged a coordinated series of ambushes on federal police convoys Tuesday. Attacks continued until almost midnight Tuesday, wounding at least five federal police officers. The death toll from the clashes stood at 20 gunmen and four federal police. About 15 people were injured in the attacks, in which gunmen hijacked trucks and buses to block highways.

Pena Nieto sent thousands of troops and federal police to the area two months ago seeking to regain control of the state from the Knights Templar, just as his predecessor periodically deployed forces to Michoacan, which is Calderon's home state. While residents initially cheered the latest arrival and some recently formed self-defense groups agreed to put down their arms, the calm was short-lived. The cartel's deep local roots and proven capacity for violence could make Michoacan the graveyard of Pena Nieto's pledge to reduce drug violence. "They are challenging the Mexican state on an equal footing," said Edgardo Buscaglia, a senior scholar at Columbia University who studies organized crime in Latin America, noting that in many areas of Michoacan the Knights Templar gang is the de-facto law. "You have state vacuums in Mexico that are not covered by any kind of institutional framework ... and the cartels are moving in to capture pieces of the state."

The government has defended its plan to restore order, even though officials have never made very clear what that plan is. "We know that for certain we are on the right path to regaining public safety, even though it's quite clear that won't be easy," Michoacan state Gov. Jesus Reyna said after Tuesday's attacks. So far the government doesn't seem to have a different strategy than Calderon's for the complex, bloody, multi-sided battle in Michoacan that pits the pseudo-religious Knights Templar against police, vigilante groups and the rival New Generation Jalisco cartel. New Generation, which authorities say is aligned with some vigilante groups, is looking to take over Michoacan by casting itself as a cartel interested only in moving drugs and criticizing the Knights Templar for their kidnappings and extortions of everyday people.

Vigilantes tired of crime are fighting back with self-defense groups they call "community police." The emergence of such groups has been one factor in the new flare-up of violence. "They're ambushing federal police and us, the community police," said Misael Gonzalez, a leader of vigilantes in the town of Coalcoman, one of whose squad members was killed in clashes with the Knights Templar earlier this week. "They're desperate and surrounded." On Wednesday, dozens of masked gunmen took over the police headquarters in the Michoacan city of Aquila, brandishing assault rifles and wearing white T-shirts with the slogan "For a Free Aquila" - the same slogan that has been used by self-defense squads that have sprung up in a half dozen Michoacan towns since February to try to kick out the Knights Templar.

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