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Old 05-11-2014, 07:18 PM   #1
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Default How should US respond to Boko Haram?

FOXNews.com - Found 3 hours ago
May. 11, 2014 - 9:46 - World condemns Islamic extremists behind kidnapping of Nigerian schoolgirls
Nigerian families organize search for kidnapped girls - USA Today
Amnesty: Nigeria warned of Boko Haram raid at girls school, failed to act - CNN
"We ran and we ran": A Nigerian girl tells CNN she still feels afraid after escaping Boko Haram - CNN
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How should US respond to Boko Haram?
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Old 05-26-2014, 12:39 AM   #2
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Obama gonna sit this one out...

Obama not seeking plans for US troops to rescue Nigerian girls
May 25, 2014 WASHINGTON ó The Obama administration isnít asking the Pentagon to develop options for a mission to free Nigerian schoolgirls taken hostage by the Boko Haram terrorist group, said two U.S. officials familiar with the discussions.
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American military personnel are advising and supporting the Nigerians, but the administration isnít actively considering sending U.S. forces to join in a rescue operation, said a White House official who requested anonymity because he wasnít authorized to discuss the mission publicly. The situation, like the Syrian civil war and the conflicts in South Sudan and elsewhere, pits humanitarian instincts against hard realities for a U.S. administration wary of foreign entanglements in the wake of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

A larger U.S. role in rescuing the girls may not be in Americaís national interest, said Brian Jenkins, a counterterrorism analyst at the Rand Corp. and a former U.S. special operations officer. "Without sounding cynical, these are Nigerian hostages, held by Nigerian terrorists in Nigeria who are possibly making demands on Nigeriaís government," he said. "I think we want to tread carefully in insinuating ourselves into that matter, thereby assuming responsibility for outcomes." The 80 Air Force personnel sent to neighboring Chad for a drone reconnaissance mission and the 16 military participants in a U.S. advisory group in Nigeria are the only U.S. armed forces assigned to assist Nigeria for now, U.S. Army Col. Steve Warren, a Pentagon spokesman, told reporters Thursday.

Nevertheless, more than a month after the abduction of some 250 girls and young women, President Barack Obama is coming under pressure from some members of Congress to devote more military assets to helping Nigeria hunt for them and support its fight against Boko Haram, which has killed more than 4,000 people in recent years. "Everybody knows what needs to be done - find those girls and bring the people leading and involved with Boko Haram to justice," Texas Republican Mike Conaway, chairman of the House Intelligence Subcommittee on Terrorism, said following a closed- door House briefing on the situation yesterday. "But thatís easier said than done."

The U.S. will be flying an unarmed Predator drone from Chad over an area of northeastern Nigeria the size of West Virginia, even though U.S. intelligence officials think many of the girls have been sold off, split into small groups or taken to neighboring countries. Boko Haram kidnapped the girls April 14 in a raid on a school in the northeastern town of Chibok near the border with Chad. "It would be hard to overestimate the complexity, first of locating the hostages, and then in considering how that might be resolved successfully," said Amanda Dory, deputy assistant secretary of defense for African affairs. "They may or may not all be in Nigeria," she told the House Foreign Affairs Committee earlier this week. "The sheer number of individuals involved, the complexity of the terrain - jungle for a great part of it - and the movement that could be associated over the weeks that have elapsed, creating a greater area of operations, make this a very difficult environment."

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Old 04-12-2016, 04:43 PM   #3
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'Huge rise' in child Boko Haram bombers

Boko Haram crisis: 'Huge rise' in child suicide bombers
Tue, 12 Apr 2016 - Boko Haram's use of child bombers has increased over the last year with one in five suicide attacks now carried out by children, the UN says.
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Boko Haram's use of child bombers has increased over the last year with one in five suicide attacks now done by children, the UN's child agency says. Girls, who are often drugged, were behind three-quarters of such attacks committed by the militant Islamist group in Cameroon, Nigeria and Chad. It is an 11-fold increase with four attacks in 2014 compared to 44 the next year, including January 2016. The change in tactics reflects the loss of territory in Nigeria by the group.


The seven-year insurgency, which has mainly affected north-eastern Nigeria as well as its neighbours around Lake Chad, has left some 17,000 people dead. Unicef says up to 1.3 million children have been forced from their homes across four countries: Cameroon, Chad, Nigeria and Niger. The UN report has been released as Nigeria approaches the second anniversary of the kidnapping by Boko Haram of more than 200 girls from their boarding school in the Nigerian town of Chibok.

Their abduction sparked the global campaign Bring Back Our Girls, but none of the girls have yet been found. The report, Beyond Chibok, says that boys abducted and recruited into Boko Haram's ranks are forced to attack their own families to demonstrate their loyalty. Girls are exposed to severe abuse including sexual violence and forced marriage to fighters.

A 17-year-old girl who was abducted and is living with her baby in a camp in the Nigerian city of Maiduguri told Unicef that she refused to marry despite death threats. "Then they came for me at night. They kept me locked in a house for over a month and told me: 'Whether you like it or not, we have already married you.'" She says she has often been ostracised since her escape by other women who accuse her of being a "Boko Haram wife".

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